Why I Liked Annapurna More Than Everest

 

Why I Liked Annapurna More Than Everest

Semi-unpopular opinion: the base camp of Annapurna is better than the base camp of Everest. No one may argue the not-so-famous or historically-mentioned Everest Base Camp. After all, it is no less than iconic to bring yourself to the foot of the tallest mountain on earth. Join the club if you are surprised. I expected I love both treks when I packed my bags to Nepal, but I wanted to see Everest deep down. 



1.The jungle


I wanted to see a jungle every time. Here it is, people in India use the word 'jungle' with 'forest' synonymously. In the United States however we only say forest, because we have everything - pines, oak, and birches, but we think of the Rainforest and the scenes of Jungle Book when we think about a jungle. In my life, however, I always dreamed of getting surrounded by the thick, tropical undergrowth of a damp, wine-filled jungle. I could say something special about the Annapurna Trail from my first footstep. I saw my first banana tree, having a look at this weird plant, till somebody pointed out the fruit wine hanging from the center. Palm tree mixed with waterfalls, ferns, thick moss, bamboo shoots, fine yet wildly coloured blossoms, and the thickest, greenest undergrowth I've ever seen. When trees, vines, and bamboo all seemed to work together, it sometimes felt as if we were walking through a green tunnel with only sunlight splashing. There were also beautiful forests on the path to Everest Base Camp in the lower valleys, but overall the region is far drier, which limits flora and fauna. In comparison, the trail of Annapurna has a feeling of freshness that could not go unnoticed.


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2.Price


This is another key point if you are concerned about the budget. There are three reasons: location, transport costs, and length. As far as transport is concerned, it is much cheaper to get to the ABC railway, because it is reachable by road. The bus from Kathmandu to Pokhara is fairly cheap and a shared taxi to Nayapul, at the beginning of the trail, can be booked from there. The trail starts at Lukla, a village without road access, that can only be accessed by flight, with EBC on the other hand. The round trip is approximately 17,000 INR and 24,000 INR for the SAARC members and others respectively. EBC's location also raises prices. The only way for the cafeteria where you stay is by flight to Kathmandu, where porters carry the food on their backs (like the food you eat). The more you walk up, the longer you get from Lukla, the longer the journey is for the porters and the more lodges you will have to pay. When you reach the highest huts such as Gorakshep as well as Lobuche, the price of boiled eggs on the menu is 660 NPR and 500 NPR. The Annapurna trail is easy to reach by road, making transportation of items cheaper and the less-remote lodge is so much more pocket-friendly.




3.Pokhara


The nearest town to the start of the ABC Trek is Pokhara. Then you have to go to the village where you begin to take a short cab ride and go away if you can persuade yourself to go from Pokhara. Somehow, this town has felt like a resort on the beach. Nestled in the hills near Phewa Lake, Pokhara feels like you have been on a trip to Goa. We could not resist taking one out and rowing in the middle where the temples above the mountains and the shacks with bamboos lined the shore selling the cold as well as happy hour beers and the barbecued maize and chicken were visible. People parade out of the nearby mountains across the lake, go to the fairground with a Ferris wheel, attend concerts at the festivals around the lakeside, shop for Nepalese souvenirs on the streets, massage trekkers spas, and hide in the cubbyholes of local coffee shops.


4.Jhinu Hot Springs


Although technically you can pass through this village along the way up, I suggest taking the Jhinu route on the way back from ABC. Perfectly balanced by the slightly widening out of a bigger ridge, Jhinu is the last town in which you stay before you walk back into civilization, the perfect grand finale to a stunningly lovely week. We talked about this for days, we went up and down nearly 60km and were willing to relax our muscles for a change. We talked about it for days, after all. We had just reached Jhinu before throwing our bathing suits, sprinted down to the river, and made it easy for us to descend into the steam. The perfection was unconditional.


1 Comments

  1. nice blog
    The Chadar Trek or Zanskar frozen river trek is a winter trek in Zanskar Valley, Ladakh. The trek starts from Leh going through Shingra Koma, Tibb Cave, Naerak Camp concluding back in Leh. The 105 Km trek provides trekkers and hikers an amazing opportunity to trek on a frozen sheet of ice in subzero temperatures. The trek is operational during the months of January and February when the Zanskar river freezes into a solid sheet of ice.
    chadar trek

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